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Wiltons' Roast Grouse - A Recipe for Fall Grouse

 

The turning leaves and cooler weather of the British countryside are a clear indication that the short Northern European summer is coming to an end.

It also foreshadows the arrival of grouse season and, with it, the delicious dishes that accompany the fall months of Great Britain.

For the best recipe we know in existence, we turned to the head chef of Wiltons, a London restaurant that is as historic (it opens its doors in 1742) as it is iconic to the London Beretta Gallery staff and customers, with its location but a short-walk away from our London store.

Here is the original Wiltons recipe, followed by a brief history of the restaurant.

Says the chef: 

"At Wiltons we take pride in ensuring we have some of the best grouse in the country on our table and we also think it should be cooked simply so you can enjoy all the delights this glorious bird has to offer.

This is our recipe for you to cook this bird at home, but don’t forget if your going to do the traditional roast you need game chips, watercress and bread sauce."

The Roast Grouse

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This happens in three parts: the bird is seared on all sides on top of the oven it's then roasted in a very hot oven and, finally, it's rested. If any of these phases is skimped, the grouse will probably be under-, or unevenly, cooked.

You will have to ask your butcher to prep the bird for you and ask him for some trimmings too.

Ingredients

1    prepared grouse per serving

20ml sunflower oil

50g  dice of celeriac, carrot, shallots (mirepoix)

Sprig of fresh thyme

1dsp brandy

Method

Make sure you have taken the grouse out of the fridge 30 minutes before you roast them. If you stand it with its breast pointing upwards, the juices inside it will be better distributed.

  1. Heat the oil in a heavy-duty pan that will just contain the grouse.

  2. Lay the bird on one side of its breast and begin searing it. Turn it over on to the other side.

  3. Add the mirepoix and thyme.

  4. Turn it on to its back and continue to fry.

  5. Hold up the grouse and sear the plump ends of the breast.

  6. Pour brandy into the pan.

  7. Transfer pan and grouse to a preheated oven at 200°C Fan assisted.

  8. Allow 8 minutes for Medium Rare and 12 minutes for Medium.

  9. Rest the grouse at least 10 minutes before carving it.

 Grouse preparation

 
Roast gravy

Now you will never get the carcase of the grouse to make the gravy like we do in restaurants so ask your butcher for the neck and winglets so you can have a rich sauce that should accompany this glorious bird.

 

Ingredients

200g grouse trimmings

1    streaky bacon rasher

1    banana shallots, rough dice

1    garlic bulb, peeled and sliced

1    sprig of thyme

1    bay leaf

5    white peppercorns

salt

5    juniper berries

1tsp sherry vinegar

1tbsp     port

1tbsp     red wine

500ml     veal stock

500ml     chicken stock

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Method
  1. Colour off the grouse trimmings and bacon in a sauce pan.
  2. Add the shallots, garlic, herbs and spices. Cook this on a medium heat for 5 minutes.
  3. Now add the sherry vinegar and let it reduce down to syrup.  Just keep stirring this to release any taste morsels left on the pan.
  4. When it’s syrup and the port and reduce to a glaze, by glaze I mean a syrup consistency.
  5. Now add the red wine and reduce to a glaze.  All we are doing here is concentrating the flavours of the wine.
  6. Its now time to add the stocks and bring to the boil.
  7. Simmer, skim and cook out for 40 minutes approximately.  The sauce should coat the back of the spoon and taste full in the mouth. If you think its there, strain it and put it in the fridge till you need it.

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––– WILTONS HISTORY–––

 

Always in the St. James's area, WILTONS originally opened in 1742 as a stall selling oysters, shrimps and cockles in the Haymarket by George William Wilton, a local shellfish monger. Business prospered and moved in 1805 toCockspur Street.

 

Over the next 50 years, the premises moved around St James's and became a fully-fledged restaurant in 1840 onRyder Street, calledWiltonsOyster Rooms. The first Royal Warrant was received in 1884 as Purveyor of Oysters to QueenVictoria, and a second as Purveyors to the Prince of Wales.

 

In 1889, the restaurant moved out of the family for the first time and was bought by David Edwin Winder. In 1930, the license was taken over by Mrs Bessie Leal. Mrs Leal held the license until 1942, when a bomb was dropped on St. James’s Church, Piccadilly. Mrs Leal folded her towel and declared to Mr Olaf Hambro – who happened to be eating oysters at the bar – thatWiltonswas closed. Mr Hambro’s response was to request thatWiltonsbe added to his bill.

 

Mr Hambro engaged the services of Jimmy Marks, then oyster man at Bucks Club, and reopened a week later. WILTONS moved toBury Streetin 1964 then to its current site at55 Jermyn Streetin 1984. The restaurant is still owned by the Hambro family.

 

Its currentJermyn Streetlocation, in the heart of St James's, is ideally suited to its clientele, which includes members of the government, businesspersons, film stars and British aristocracy. Service is discreet, professional and welcoming. WILTONS is a British classic.

 

 

 

Wiltons Restaurant, 55 Jermyn Street, London SW1Y 6LX - Telephone 020 7629 9955 – www.wiltons.co.uk

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This post and its contents are the views and opinions of the author only, and do not necessarily represent Beretta.

How About a Duck Recipe?

 
By Brad Wilson - Guest Contributor

One of the most asked questions that I get from people that don't really care to eat ducks or geese is "how do you cook it?"  My answer is short, sweet, and boy does it taste good!  GUMBO!!!  After the jump (that means click on the link that says "MORE"), I will share a recipe that was shared with me and I have perfected.  This stuff will make ya slap yo momma!!!



What you need:
2 lbs. cubed duck meat
1 lb. raw peeled shrimp
1/2 lb. raw cubed fish
1 lb. smoked andouille sausage
1 lb. okra
2 lbs. bacon scraps
1 cup of flour
1 can tomatoes with onions & peppers
1 can tomatoes with chilis and lime
1 can roasted tomatoes
2 onions chopped
2 bell peppers chopped
6 stalks celery sliced
3 cloves of garlic chopped
3 bay leaves
3 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1 Tbsp Franks hot sauce
1 tsp dried thyme
1 tsp cayenne pepper
salt
pepper
Tony Chachere Cajun Spice

Fry the bacon scraps until it is nice and crispy then remove. Keep about half to throw in the gumbo.

In half the bacon oil add the flour, 1 tsp salt, 1 tsp black pepper. Cook your roux on medium heat until the flour is browned to your taste. Mine normally takes about 15 minutes. IT IS IMPERATIVE TO CONSTANTLY STIR YOUR ROUX!!!  If not it will burn and ruin your gumbo.

With the leftover bacon grease, sear the fish, shrimp, sausage, and duck meat and set to the side.

Put the roux in big pot and add the shrimp, fish, sausage, onoins, bell peppers, garlic, 1/2 the bacon. Turn up the heat to high and cook and stir for 2-3 minutes.
Put the duck in a pot of water and bring it to a boil. Once it begins to boil, put the shrimp peels in the pot. Cook for 1-2 minutes.

Strain out the shrimp peels and discard of them.

Place the duck and it's water, okra, the 3 cans tomatoes, celery, bay leaves, Worcestershire, Franks, thyme, cayenne pepper, Tony Chahceres to taste in the big pot. Add water to the concoction to make it like a thin soup.

Turn heat down and simmer about 2 hours or until the desired consistancy is reached.
Serve it over white or dirty rice.

I have made this for a number of people and I have yet to find someone that didn't like it.  Be sure to let us know how your next meal turns out when you decide to cook this favorite of mine.

Brad Wilson is an avid outdoorsman targeting waterfowl and saltwater fish and is a guest contributor for the Beretta Blog.  He can be reached on Twitter or YouTube.

Make sure you follow Beretta on FacebookTwitterYouTube.

This post and its contents are the views and opinions of the author only, and do not represent those of Beretta.

Make sure you follow Beretta on FacebookTwitter or YouTube

 

This post and its contents are the views and opinions of the author only, and do not necessarily represent Beretta.

Shotgun Shells: The Ins and Outs of Selection (Part 1)

 

By Brad Wilson - Guest Contributor

How I love my hand loads!
In a previous entry by fellow blogger Adam Brassfield titled “Shell Selection for Waterfowl”, Adam talks about what size shot he would typically use for different types of waterfowl.  What he based everything off of was the size of  bird he would be chasing that certain day.  Adam laid down some great groundwork for new and old hunters that sometimes get mislead on what size shot they should be using.  This is the first thing everyone should take into consideration when choosing shot.  I would recommend reading that post as he has some great information in it.

For the next few segments we will take it a step further now that you understand that using 3.5” BB during early teal season is akin to bringing a SCUD missile to a boxing match.

I could honestly go on for hours and probably lose your attention with everything I am about to throw at you so for the sake of time and attention I will break this up into 3 different segments.  Factory VS hand loads, patterning, and what you can do to manipulate variables to achieve the outcome you are looking for.

After the jump I will talk briefly about factory ammo as well as hand loads….
So the first thing that you need to understand is that sometimes factory ammo can be more of a gimmick than a tried and true performer.  I personally jumped on the Black Cloud bandwagon when it first came out like many others and for good reason.  The ammo was marketed based on the wad design that would not allow the shot to leave the cup (wad) until about 10 yards from the end of the barrel.  This improved long range shots due to the tight patterning and left people in amazement at the shots they were able to take.  What people didn’t understand is that the shot loaded into the shell was no different than any other conventional steel shot.  The misconception lead to folks using the BC on decoying birds, and a lot of misses came as a result.

Then came Hevi Steel by Environmetal.  This stuff is what I like to run if for some reason I run out of my home loads and don’t have time to crank out a few boxes before the next hunt.  When you really look at the physics of this load you begin to understand that this type of load makes more sense because of its actual knock down power or terminal momentum.  This load uses a mix of hevi shot and conventional steel to achieve its effectiveness.

The ultimate way to get the best ballistics out of your gun is hand loading.  I started hand loading last year and haven’t looked back.  I can load heavy, light, fast, slow, or any combination of these to achieve my desired results.  My most recent load is running at 1750 fps with #4 conventional steel in a 1oz 2.75” load.  This has enough terminal momentum to drop ducks out to 45+ yards.  With this kind of performance, all my buddies are asking me to start loading boxes up for them!  I am now a firm believer in hand loading all of my ammunition.

In the next segment of this topic we will be talking about how to find out what works best out of your gun.  Patterning different shells is the key to success!  That Black Cloud just might be the best option for you out of your current configuration.

Brad Wilson is an avid outdoorsman targeting waterfowl and saltwater fish and is a guest contributor for the Beretta Blog.  He can be reached on Twitter or YouTube.

Make sure you follow Beretta on FacebookTwitterYouTube.

This post and its contents are the views and opinions of the author only, and do not represent those of Beretta.

Make sure you follow Beretta on FacebookTwitter or YouTube

 

This post and its contents are the views and opinions of the author only, and do not necessarily represent Beretta.

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