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If our guns could talk...

 

A few things our guns might say if they could talk:

I don’t care what your buddies said about that gun.  You do not need to get your hands on her to see how she shoots.

I am not going to fit into that holster.  How long have we been together, and you still don't know what size I am?

No, that's ok, I don't need any attention.  I'll just keep working no matter dirty or tired I am, because you need me to.  It's ok.  Really.  Don't worry about little ole me.

Those are most certainly aftermarket accessories.  She didn't leave the factory with those sights.

I’m trying to watch what I eat.  Could I maybe have some of the top shelf ammo once in a while?

Let’s see if her finish is that nice after being in your holster for 10 years. 

Who taught you how to lubricate?  Oil doesn’t go there.

Are you ever going to clean out this range bag?  It stinks in here. 

You're obviously lost, so be a real man and ask directions.  The match starts in 20 minutes and I don't want to be late. 

Oh, the match is over?  No, I don’t mind if you go hang out with your shooting buddies.   I’ll just sit here patiently waiting for you, in this filthy range bag.

How would you like to spend the day stuffed in your pants?

I know you would like to play with two of us at the same time, but that only works in the movies.

Fine.

Her action won't be that smooth after 20 years and 300,000 rounds.

These scratches will not buff out and the finish is wearing off my frame.  Sigh.  Will you still love me when I’m old?

What do you mean I could use a new set of "springs?"  What exactly is wrong with the ones I have? 

It’s no big deal to let other people squeeze my trigger.  I’ll still come home with you.

You're very good with me dear, but some projects might be beyond your abilities.  Why don't you just call the gunsmith?

Every time you time you miss a shot, I laugh a little.

I saw you looking at that other gun.  Am I not good enough for you?  What does she have that I don’t?

Do these grips make me look fat?

Behind every good shooter is a good gun. Don't you forget it Mister.

Maybe if you kept your eyes on my sights, you would hit the target.

I can smell that gun oil on you.  Where have you been?

Don’t blame me for the score sheet.  You were the one pulling the trigger.

I know you don't like commitment, but we would both be much happier if it was just the two of us.  What do you need those other guns for?

How was your day?  Mine was fine.  I just sat here in the safe waiting for you to pay some attention to me.

Yes dear, you are the best shooter I’ve ever had.

this is it

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This post and its contents are the views and opinions of the author only, and do not necessarily represent Beretta.

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Going Through The Change

 

by Carrie Lightfoot - Guest Contributor

Photo: Change of seasons by Silveryn


I suppose I could be writing about the change of seasons as we all are invigorated by the crisp weather and the changing leaves. Or, I could even be writing about THE CHANGE. You know: the change that involves hormones and hot flashes! 

No, I won’t go there; not today.  The change I am talking about is the very profound change that a woman goes through after making the decision to own a firearm, goes through the very important process of deciding which firearm is right for her and training to properly, safely and proficiently learn how to shoot it to defend herself. 

It changes us profoundly. We feel different and we move through our daily lives differently. We in fact are different. How so? We have confidence. With this new sense of confidence we start to look people in the eyes more when we are out and about. We scan the environment with new keen sense of awareness of possible risks and people out of place. We walk through parking lots, restaurants and other public places more prepared and with the confidence that given the worst possible case scenario, we know we are fully prepared to give it all we’ve got to defend ourselves. This not only changes us in the realm of self protection, it also effects every aspect of our lives and relationships.

I believe society breeds high levels of insecurity in women, socially, emotionally and physically. We seem to always be the “weaker one” or the one “not good enough”. The ability to level the playing field, or more appropriately the battle field, is extremely significant for a woman. We feel less like a victim and more like an empowered, fierce force. 


The role of self protector doesn’t come naturally for most women. We are raised to believe we are protected by others. Today, this just isn’t an option for it is not possible in this crazy world, with out crazy schedules to be protected by our men, our police or others all of the time. Women are taking on this role with courage, intelligence and passion.

So we are changed on the outside because we now carry a firearm and are equipped to defend ourselves, but we are also changed on the inside because we carry a new sense of confidence that impacts every area of our lives. 

Has it changed you? 

Carrie Lightfoot is owner of The Well Armed Woman and quest contributor for the Beretta Blog. Join the dynamic group of women shooters on Facebook orTwitter and visit www.thewellarmedwoman.com

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This post and its contents are the views and opinions of the author only, and do not necessarily represent Beretta.

Make sure you follow Beretta on FacebookTwitter or YouTube

 

This post and its contents are the views and opinions of the author only, and do not necessarily represent Beretta.

When you've got to go.... You've got to go!

 
by Carrie Lightfoot - Guest Contributor


The ladies' room, potty, doing your business, going to the bathroom, or even powdering your nose. Whatever you call it - we ALL have to do it! The problem is, what in the world do you do with your concealed firearm when you do? 

For some obvious reasons, men have it a little easier in this department, well... most of the time. There is quite a bit of confusion and not a lot of discussion on this “interesting” topic. In a recent discussion on The Well Armed Woman Facebook page, the lack of information clearly results in less-than-safe solutions. So, what should you do? You don’t want anyone in the next stall to see your firearm, freak out and call 911 when you’re simply answering Mother Nature’s call. You don’t want it to fall on the floor and slide over to into the next stall with a mother assisting her young child and you certainly don’t want to do anything that could risk an accidental discharge. So what do you do? 

Photo: Theo Romeo UCD Advocate
The answer is quite simple. The less you do the better! Any time your remove your firearm from its holster you create risk. A well-made "in the pants" or "on the waist" holster should hold your firearm snug, even if you accidentally turn it upside down. If yours doesn’t, get a new one.  Not everyone likes a thumb break but here is a good place where they come in handy. Keep your hand on the HOLSTERED firearm as you carefully slide down your pants and keep your hand on it. Keep the top of your pants up off the floor and out of view from “neighbors”. If you’re wearing a belt, this is even more important as once you undo your belt - the weight of whole package takes on a mind of its own. 

The problems arise when you remove the firearm to get comfortable. Some of you are placing it on the toilet paper dispenser, the back of the toilet and even hanging it by the trigger guard on the hook on the door. These are no safe solutions and yes, even the most responsible and conscientious gun owners can leave and forget their firearms behind. It has happened, perhaps it has even to you. 

Many women are wearing bra holsters and belly bands. With these holsters this challenge is eliminated. For those of you that carry in your purse, as awkward as it may be, place your purse on your lap or even hang it over your body cross body style.  

If for some reason not addressed here you MUST remove the firearm from your body, keep it holstered and hold it or keep it on your lap while you’re “busy”.

All of this “work” just to do your business may seem cumbersome, uncomfortable and even a pain in the neck. The truth is, this comes with the responsibility of safe gun ownership. If you really think about it, we are very lucky to even have the right and opportunity to be a little uncomfortable this way.  So... Give thanks and go take care of business! 

Carrie Lightfoot is owner of The Well Armed Woman and quest contributor for the Beretta Blog. Join the dynamic group of women shooters on Facebook orTwitter and visit www.thewellarmedwoman.com


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This post and its contents are the views and opinions of the author only, and do not necessarily represent Beretta.


Make sure you follow Beretta on FacebookTwitter or YouTube

 

This post and its contents are the views and opinions of the author only, and do not necessarily represent Beretta.

Top 10 Reasons I Hunt

 
By Brad Wilson - Guest Contributor

As a new hunting season approaches there are a ton of things that run through my head in preparation for what is to come in the next few months.  Is the boat ready to go?  Are the decoys rigged up?  Did I make all the repairs on equipment that needed to be made?  Last week I was out in the garage answering all these questions.  I pulled out my old blind stool and sat down in it and started thinking about things.  One question that kept coming back to me was WHY?  Why do I go to the extents that I do to chase fowl?  Why do I spend the amount of hard earned money on this sport?  Why do I wake up at 3:00 AM to run a boat for 30 minutes in 30 degree weather, trounce through marsh mud that rivals some of the deepest quicksand around, and then spend 45 minutes setting out decoys just to shoot some waterfowl?

Here is my top 10 reasons I do what I do to chase waterfowl.

10.  The smell of gunpowder at sun up as a group of greenwing teal buzz the decoys.

  9.  I have a chance to be out on the water. Growing up on the Gulf Coast, I have saltwater running through my veins!

  8.  Seeing a bird crumple in mid air after I pull the trigger on my Beretta A400 Xtreme!

  7.  Watching my yellow lab, Aeva, charge hard after that bird that just crumpled.

  6.  Enjoying a hot cup of coffee and a blind breakfast during that first lull.

  5.  Because duck breast, jalapeno, and cream cheese all wrapped in bacon and grilled tastes Mmmmmm Mmmmm GOOD!!!

  4.  Knowing that I am in GOD's country and I am doing what he intended for me to do.

  3.  I am able to share that blind with some of my closest friends.

  2.  I can spend time with my kids that I cherish so much.

And the number one reason I do what I do to chase waterfowl:

Passion!  I have a passion for the outdoors and everything that it stands for.  I have passion for sharing those times with my kids and friends.  I have a passion for what God has graced me with.

I take this time to be thankful for those ten things and many others that I am afforded in this great nation and have been so graciously given by the Man upstairs.

So what is on your top 10 list?


Brad Wilson is an avid outdoorsman targeting waterfowl and saltwater fish and is a guest contributor for the Beretta Blog.  He can be reached on Twitter or YouTube.

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This post and its contents are the views and opinions of the author only, and do not represent those of Beretta.

Make sure you follow Beretta on FacebookTwitter or YouTube

 

This post and its contents are the views and opinions of the author only, and do not necessarily represent Beretta.

Swapping Guns With Social Media

 

By Jason Parks – Guest Contributor

About a year ago I joined two Facebook groups that were formed for the purpose of buying, selling and trading sporting goods locally. One group focuses on a closer geographic area to me while the other has a wider geographic reach.

At first the pages mainly listed guns then gradually as more people joined the groups I started seeing other items like tree stands, boats, ATVs, trucks, golf clubs and even dogs.

I have purchased two guns from individuals listing on these sites and both times were a lot of fun. I was a little hesitant at first about buying a gun from a complete stranger, but you can tell a lot about a person when you are haggling with them.

Here is a sample of one of the posts:



I have made several observations about the sites that I want to share with you.

First, these swapping pages on Facebook are a great way to bring sportsmen together. The only other time you might get even part of this group together is at a gun show.

Second, listing on these pages is more advantageous than classifies ads due to the ability to post multiple pictures which allows potential buyers to get a good look at the seller's items.

Third, these pages are a seller's market. Items are usually listed at or above fair market value. Based on what I see, the majority of the people selling don’t come off their posted prices, but there is a lot of haggling via personal messages between buyers and sellers that you can’t see so there is no way to tell how much people are negotiating or coming down off listed prices.

Note: trolls that are abrasive or verbally abusive are usually quickly blocked by the page admins so members don't have to deal with them. Here is the definition of an internet troll according to UrbanDictionary if you don't know what a troll is.

Fourth, these sites provide a free service by allowing their members to list items to sell or trade. At no cost, it is also cheaper than exhibiting or attending a gun show.

Last, since these pages have started I have noticed a sharp decline in gun related classified ads. I think we will see a complete migration away from classified ads on guns in the future and any other items listed in classifieds as soon as someone creates the page for it. I can even see the potential of how pages like these could replace local gun shows if done correctly.

Facebook gun trading pages are a great way for folks to buy, sell and trade guns, bows, knives and other sporting goods and will probably continues to grow as a medium for sportsmen and gun enthusiast to connect...

...as long as "they" will allow the sites to operate.

What do you think about this sudden growth of these pages?

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You can follow Jason on Twitter @thejasonparks


This post and its contents are the views and opinions of the author only, and do not necessarily represent those of Beretta.

Make sure you follow Beretta on FacebookTwitter or YouTube

 

This post and its contents are the views and opinions of the author only, and do not necessarily represent Beretta.

10 Gun Wish List

 

By Jason Parks – Guest Contributor

10 guns I can’t afford....

…right now…

….but wish I had.

In no particular order:


I generally prefer short barreled pistols, but this one is the exception. I have always liked the look and feel of long slide 1911 pistols. I tried to buy or trade one away from a good friend of mine, but he never would let go of it. As long slides go the Nighthawk is the coolest one I have see so far. It comes in 10mm so the only thing that would make it better is if it was in .45 ACP. (Picture courtesy of http://www.knesekguns.com/commercial/Nighthawk-10mm-Long-Slide)



In a world where tactical semi-auto pistols reign supreme, I like the direction Smith & Wesson went with this pistol. Given the choice between Smith & Wesson Model 325 Thunder Ranch and a tactical semi-auto, I would have a hard time deciding on which to get. (Picture courtesy of http://www.knesekguns.com/commercial/SW-Model-325-Thunder-Ranch)



This is one awesome rifle. I would prefer an original 1895 Winchesterin .405 but would not complain if it was in .30-06 or 7.62x54R. I love old, large caliber, lever action rifles like the .405, but it would be really cool to have one that shoots .30-60 like my deer rifle. Who wouldn’t want to own a piece of history like a Model 1895 Winchester(Picture courtesy of http://www.americanrifleman.org/articles/winchester-model-95/)



I am a big fan of .45-70’s and of carbines. The 1873 Trapdoor Springfield is the original .45-70. The Springfield Trapdoor Carbine is the Alpha Prime Numero Uno of .45-70 carbines and I want one. (Picture courtesy of http://www.uberti.com/firearms/springfield-trapdoor.php)



Every hunter alive wants a double rifle, but few can afford them. Once again, the USSG Double Rifle comes in .45-70, but I didn’t know this one was available until I started this post. As double rifles go, this one is almost affordable. The next step up costs 5 times as much. I might be able to afford this one if I liquidate some inventory and clean the kitchen every night for the next 8 years and vacuum for the next 12 years and.... (Picture courtesy of http://www.budsgunshop.com/catalog/product_info.php/products_id/60304)



A take down, lever action .45-70. What more could I ask for? (Picture courtesy of http://wildwestguns.com/copilot.html)



Small, stainless and .45 ACP, this Kimber would probably be my first choice for a conceal carry pistol. Sorry Beretta. (Picture courtesy of http://www.knesekguns.com/commercial/Kimber-Stainless-Ultra-Raptor-II-45ACP-3200196)



I grew up watching Steve McQueen bring in the bad guys with this gun on Wanted Dead or Alive. Ever since then, I have wanted a Mare’s Leg. There are several out there now to choose from, but I like Henry's brass receiver and octagon barrel. (Picture courtesy of http://www.henryrepeating.com/rifle-mares-leg.cfm)



If I were to take up Cowboy Action Shooting full time, this pistol would be my first choice. I prefer short barreled revolvers especially when it comes to single action pistols and the ease of loading and unloading a top break pistol is obvious. (Picture courtesy of http://www.uberti.com/firearms/top-break.php)



Like I have said, I like light, short barreled guns. I also prefer semi-automatic shotguns over pump or double-barreled shotguns. I didn’t add this one to kowtow to Beretta. I have a semi-auto shotgun that I am very happy with. It is not a Beretta, and it is not a 12 gauge. But if I needed a new shotgun, the Beretta A400 Xplot Light KO would be at the top of my wish list. (Picture courtesy of http://www.berettausa.com/products/a400-xplor-light-ko-12ga-3/?F_All=Y)


Bonus:


I might be able to afford this pistol if I could ever find one. If you are not familiar with this revolver, it is a .38 caliber pistol that has the capability to shoot 25 different types of ammunition including .357 Magnum, 9mm, all types of .38’s and 7.62x25. This is one of those if I could only own one gun types of pistols. In a survival situation, this pistol is the one to have. (Picture courtesy of http://airbornecombatengineer.typepad.com/airborne_combat_engineer/2007/05/medusa_revolver.html)


So what guns are on your wish list?

This post and its contents are the views and opinions of the author only, and do not necessarily represent those of Beretta.

Make sure you follow Beretta on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.
You can follow Jason on Twitter @thejasonparks

Make sure you follow Beretta on FacebookTwitter or YouTube

 

This post and its contents are the views and opinions of the author only, and do not necessarily represent Beretta.

Firearms Accessories: Today's Choices

 

By Keith Hollar – Guest Contributor

As I was thinking about the state of the accessory market I realized how good we have it at the moment.  There is almost an overwhelming amount of options out there for almost any firearm you have.  You can get different stocks, sights, barrels, triggers, scopes, electronic sights, compensators, flash hiders, magazines, flashlights, lasers, or mounting rails for almost any weapon out there.  Don’t like the finish on your firearm?  There are companies out there today that can create almost any design you can dream up on your firearms.  There are also finishes that you can buy and do yourself.

Usually I don’t make too many changes to my firearms after I purchase them.  Most of my rifles have scopes on them and all but one or two of my handguns have at least aftermarket stocks on them.  On handguns I feel that a nice pair of stocks is an easy way to dress up and personalize a firearm.  One of the latest handguns I’ve done this to is my Beretta Stampede.



It is a standard model so it came with the black plastic checkered stocks.  I never really cared for them, however it took me a while to figure out and find the ones I wanted.  I settled on ivory colored polymer ones because I really liked the way it dressed up this revolver with its case hardened frame.  I also felt it added a classic look to it.  I purchased another pair from a small company that I found on the internet.  When I received them they were not like the picture, but because of the cost I tried to see if they’d work.  I don’t know which revolver they were made for but it sure wasn’t the Stampede.  The shape was all wrong and they were way too big.  Luckily I was able to find a pair of the Beretta branded ones on the accessories website and ordered them.  These, no surprise, fit it just right.  They also make it feel a lot better in the hand.  Even though they are smooth they don’t slip around in my hand during shooting.  Now that is with some light .45 Colt loads and I wasn’t sweating so I’ll have to see how they perform long term.

What are your thoughts on this subject?  What do you like to do to your firearms to individualize them?

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This post and its contents are the views and opinions of the author only, and do not represent those of Beretta.

Make sure you follow Beretta on FacebookTwitter or YouTube

 

This post and its contents are the views and opinions of the author only, and do not necessarily represent Beretta.

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